Smoking & Pregnancy


  • Smoking during pregnancy puts both the mother and baby at risk.  Mothers are more likely to have miscarriages or deliver prematurely.  Babies have more than double the risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), and are at a higher risk for learning disabilities, autism, asthma, ear infections and upper respiratory problems.  


What Women Can Do
  • Women who are attempting to become pregnant, are pregnant, or nursing, should abstain from both nicotine and alcoholic beverages.    
  • Adults should set an example and not glamorize products which kill and destroy health.  What is not good for youth is usually not good for adults either—such as, smoking, pornography, alcohol and drugs.  
  • 7 good reasons for pregnant women to quit smoking:
1)  Cigarette chemicals reach your baby.  

2)  Your breast milk will be free of cigarette chemicals.

3)  Women who smoke have a higher risk of bleeding and miscarriage.

4)  Your pregnancy may be easier as you will have more energy and be able to breathe
      easier, and cough less.

5)  Your baby will be a healthier weight and sick less often with colds, bronchitis, ear infections, allergies and asthma.  

6)  Your baby’s risk of SIDS will be lower.

7)  You will live longer with a lower risk of lung cancer, heart disease and other illnesses.  

  • Stop the Nicotine Addiction.  Realize that first you have to fight the powerful nicotine addiction, and then the habit.  Some helpful tips to help you stop smoking for good are:  
    • Stay focused by writing down your reasons for quitting; pick a date within a month to stop.   
    • Record situations that trigger your craving for a cigarette.  Plan ahead for tempting situations and plan an alternative action
    • Read the article “Addictions and Compulsions” under the “Addiction” topic.
    • Ask for support from family and friends
    • Reward yourself for small victories
    • Put help-line numbers by the phone
    • …and keep trying.  
  • Obtain the best possible chance of quitting by considering the following advice:
    • Use nicotine replacement therapy
    • Take a drug to ease withdrawal
    • Get counseling and emotional support  
Local Organizations
Additional Resources

The Spokane Regional Health District and Community Health Education and Resources offers a program to help smokers quit.  The 5 week class is free to pregnant mothers.  Others who enroll pay a total of only $5 if they attend each class.  For more information, call (509) 232-8138.  http://cherspokane.org 

Quit for You, Quit for Two, designed to decrease tobacco use among pregnant women and new mothers.  Contact the Washington State Tobacco Quit Line (1-800-QUIT-NOW, or 1-800-784-8669)
http://quitline.com  Simply calling the quit line can double a smoker’s chance of quitting successfully.  

For help to quit smoking. 
http://smokefree.gov
http://quitsmokingsupport.com