Suicides Among Veterans

  • Movement 22 - 22 Too Many.  This is a mission to defeat suicide, an Instagram Suicide Prevention network for Veterans in dark places.  “When vets get to the point where they feel secluded, they insulate; but they need to know there is someone there for them.  We are here for you before you take that permanent step.  We plead with vets with suicidal thoughts to call anytime, day or night. 

    Call the Instagram Suicide Prevention network at (801) 971-9340, where you will find 180 Vets there, offering a lifeline to talk with other vets.  When professional help is needed, they will contact a network of psychologists.  

Johnny Primo and Casey Gray are currently developing a website and a smart phone app which will give vets more resources when they find themselves in a dark place.  They intend on doing this for the long haul, as long as there is a need, with the goal of saving lives.  

Johnny Primo’s ultimate message to veterans: “If you were courageous enough to do what you did in the military, just pick up a phone and call.  That’s all you have to do.”   (Special Forces Veteran Johnny Primo, reporter Chip Reid, CBS Evening News, June 15, 2015)

  • Veterans Crisis Line:  1-800-273-8255  This line connotes Veterans in crisis and their families and friends with qualified, caring Dept of Veterans Affairs responders through a confidential toll-free hotline, online chat, or text.  Veterans and their loved ones can call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1, chat online, or send a text message to 838255 to receive confidential support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.  Support for deaf and hard of hearing individuals is available.  Learn to identify the Warning Signs, and find other Suicide and Crisis Resources.  http://www.veteranscrisisline.net/
Statistics
  • Suicides by vets happen an average of 20 times a day.  (Veterans share their stories to help others fight PTSD, Jim Axelrod, CBS Evening News, September 7, 2016)



  • For every soldier we have lost in combat, 25-30 take their own lives.  (The Headstrong Project, http://getheadstrong.org/)


  • The estimated suicide rate has been reduced by the Department of Veterans Affairs, to 20 vets dying each day.  Even one military suicide is still too many.  ("Pushing Ahead," CBS This Morning, August 17, 2016) 

  • Veteran suicide risk is approximately 50% higher than the general population.  The VA estimates that 22 of the 2 million Iraq and Afghanistan vets die each day by their own hand.  ("Detailed study confirms high suicide rate among recent veterans," reporter Alan Zarembo, L.A. Times, alan.zarembo@latimes.com, January 14, 2015, http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-veteran-suicide-20150115-story.html)

What You Can Do
  • Suicide Prevention.  Veterans in crisis, or those concerned about them, can call the 24-hour suicide prevention hot line through the Dept. of Veterans Affairs and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration at (800) 273-8255.

Local Organizations
Additional Resources
Behavioral Health Center
Spokane Veteran's Affairs Medical Center
4815 N. Assembly St.
Spokane, WA
(509) 434-7000
This facility, dedicated in August 2012, can help veterans with mental health, addiction and social-service needs.  It offers both group treatment and one-on-one counseling.  It provides a neuropsychology clinic for brain injuries, PTSD, or other cognitive deficits, as well as a nationally recognized program for homeless veterans. 

Mann-Grandstaff VA Medical Center
(formerly Veterans Affairs Medical Center 
4815 N. Assembly Street 
Spokane, WA   99205
(509) 434-7000
(outside Spokane)  (800)  325-7940
http://www.spokane.va.gov/contact/

VA Suicide Hotline
1-800-273-8255
(If you are a Veteran considering suicide, please call this number and press 1 to speak to a VA Counselor)

Vets Garage
1102 W. College
Spokane, WA
(509) 919-3176
http://www.vetsgarage.org
The Garage provides a "safe place" to help all veterans transition to civilian life.