Mentoring Children & Youth


Tell me
and I forget,

 Teach me and I remember,

          Involve me and I learn.         
                  - Benjamin Franklin

  • Caring adults who commit to make a difference in the life of a child, can reduce that child’s chance of using drugs, drinking alcohol, or dropping out of school. 

Statistics
  • Approximately 5,000 children in Spokane County have parents who are incarcerated. 
What You Can Do
  • Mentor youth who lack traditional support.  Remember to— listen first, then talk; be dependable; don’t make promises you can’t keep; focus on building a solid relationship before asking personal questions; help him/her work out a problem, rather than telling them what to do; and don’t be discouraged if your partner is more lax than you about connecting.  
  • Help children work toward worthwhile goals.
  • Teach life skills to children and teens, including communication, financial responsibility, career/college planning, dressing for success, interview techniques, and more.
  • Invite youth to shadow you at work.  Give them an opportunity to develop marketable skills.  
  • Include youth in service projects.  Youth who volunteer tend to be twice as likely to do so as adults.  See the link on this website “Family Projects” for ideas. 

  • Be thoroughly honest so children learn to trust.
  • Mentor a child.  In their book “Growing Up Poor,” sociologists Terry Williams and William Kornblum noted that successful and unsuccessful youth from lower-income urban communities differ in one key way:  The successful ones have mentors.  

  • Mentor children as you give free lessons in music, tennis, art, dance, woodworking, auto mechanics, or whatever talent and skill you have to share.  Help children find some of their hidden talents, and spend time with someone who cares. 
Local Organizations
Additional Resources
Goodwill's Good Guides
(a program for at-risk youth between 12 and 18)
This program targets students who struggle in school or at home, or students with social challenges.  It matches students with mentors who get more involved on a one-on-one level, both at the group meetings and in other settings.  Students are referred to Good Guides by their school counselor, but it is not available at every school; and there is a huge unmet need. 

Millwood Community Presbyterian Church  

3223 North Marguerite Rd.  
Spokane Valley, WA      
(509) 924-2350
craig@millwoodpc.org
Providing a safe place for youth in Spokane Valley to hang-out, where they can enjoy after-school and evening activities.  Students are welcome who are struggling with homelessness, poverty, learning disabilities, social challenges, and substance abuse.