Family and Friends

  • For Mothers.   Give your Mom a hug and a homemade card for Mother’s Day.
    • Memories of Your Mother.  Write your most enjoyable memories of your mother on slips of paper.  Place them in a special or decorated jar.  Give the jar to her for a special occasion, or simply any time to show your love and appreciation for her.  (You can do the same thing for your father.) 

    • Thank your Mother.  Make a list of all the things your mother has done for you.  Send it to her.

    • Other Mothers.  Identify a motherly figure in your life and take her flowers.
  • For Fathers.  Make a special gift for your father by decorating a jar or box, placing popcorn inside, and making a label for the container which says, “For the greatest POP in the World!” 

  • Connect with Family.  Is there a family member you haven’t talked to lately?  Visit with them, or call them.

  • Give a Compliment.  Point out a virtue in someone they don’t see in themselves. 

  • Say Kind Words to Others.  You have the "power to  increase the sum total of the world’s happiness…by giving a few words of sincere appreciation to someone who is lonely or discouraged...Perhaps you will forget tomorrow the kind words you say today, but the recipient may cherish them over a lifetime…"   (Dale Carnegie, author)
  • Babysit.  Surprise your parents by offering to babysit your siblings while they spend time together.  
  • TV Blackout.  Ask your family to have a TV blackout for an evening, a day, or a week.  Turn off the TV and enjoy spending time and making memories with your family rather than watching TV.  
  • Family Service.  Service begins in the family.  Do your part to help with family chores—wash dishes, vacuum, make beds, keep your room clean, cook, iron, rake leaves, and shovel snow to help your family or a friend.  
  • Encourage Service Within Your Family.  Suggest family members place a colorful pom-pom or popcorn seed inside a large glass bottle each time they do a good turn.
  • Take Along a Friend.  When you or your family does volunteer work, invite some of your friends to participate.    
  • Secret Service.  Take food, flowers, an inspiring book, etc. to a neighbor or someone in need.  Quietly set it on the porch, ring the doorbell, run and hide!   Remember—“There’s no limit to the good you can do, if you don’t care who gets the credit.”  
  • Elderly or Disabled.  Ask the elderly or disabled if they have any chores they need help with, such as yard work, raking leaves, pulling weeds, shoveling snow, or painting.   
  • Single Parents.  If you know a mother who is single, occasionally offer to baby sit her children for free, or help with house and yard work.  
  • Grandparents.  Adopt a Grandparent who has no family in Spokane, and offer to help. 

  • Express Gratitude.  Write a thank you letter to someone who has positively impacted your life.
  • Soap and Water.  Spend a few hours washing cars, windshields or windows in your neighborhood or for an elderly person.  
  • Bake Cookies.  Bake and take cookies to someone who is lonely—and then stay awhile and visit.
  • Babysitting.  Make a babysitting kit containing your favorite storybooks, toys, games, easy crafts, etc. to share with children you baby sit, rather than watching TV.  
  • Phone Numbers. 
    • Help your family create a list of important phone numbers to call when help is needed, and keep a copy in the house and in the car.   (Cell Phones, Doctor, Dentist, Parents’ phone number at work, School, Coaches, Neighbors, Relatives, Emergency numbers…)    
    • Neighborhood Phone List.  Create and distribute a list of names and phone numbers for your neighbors.  This can be used for social calls or emergencies.  
    • Check for Phone book Errors.  Check the local Phone books to see if your family’s home and business information is correct.  If it isn’t, inform your parents who can call the Customer Service number on their phone bill to request their information be corrected.   

  • More Ideas.  Find more ideas for giving service to Friends and Family on this site.