• Most beauty products, including makeup and skincare items, use photos that are edited to adjust a person's size, shape or skin color.  Helen Foulkes said, "There is a shift in what is attracting young women:  "If you look at girls age 13 to 24, they're on YouTube, and the reason they're going to YouTube is they're saying, 'I see imagery there that's realistic.  They look just like I do.'  They're saying, 'Celebrities aren't real. I want to relate to people who have my own imperfections and feel that I'm empowered by the fact I look like these people.'

    CVS Health, the nation's leading drugstore chain, informs customers if certain advertisements for beauty products were digitally altered. A special watermark will highlight imagery without material changes.  The consumer will know whether images have been digitally altered or not.  "So women, as they're looking at photographs, will know what's real, and not feel that they have to live up to some unrealistic standard," Foulkes said.

    "A couple of statistics that really hit us are that 80% of women feel worse about themselves after looking at beauty ads, and 42% of girls in grades one through three want to be thinner," said Helena Foulkes, Executive VP of CVS Health.  "For us, as a big health care company, we felt this was a health issue. In fact, the American Medical Association has said that propagation of unrealistic body imagery is hurting our health."
    (source:  "CVS Health, Keeping it Real," VP Helena Foulkes, executive vice president of CVS Health and president of CVS Pharmacy, CBS News, January 15, 2018) 
  • 1 in 4 girls will not finish high school.

    78% of girls under 17 are unhappy with their bodies.

    1 in 5 girls will be a victim of childhood sexual abuse.
What You Can Do
  • Consider becoming a foster parent for a girl.  Contact Fostering Washington.

  • For Girls:  Learn to sew your own clothes so you can dress both modestly and fashionably, as well as mend your own clothing. There is currently a growing movement that teaches young women to reclaim their self-respect by dressing modestly while dressing stylishly.  
The Good Girl Revolution (Ballantine) is a paperback edition of Girls Gone Mild, and includes a discussion guide for classrooms and book clubs.   Author Wendy Shalit reports on a growing trend of new female role models who are rebelling--by reclaiming their individuality instead of going along with the pressure to be "bad." As Publisher's Weekly puts it, this book takes a hard look. . . at how we got to where we are and what progress can be made, and does so with a conviction that will resonate with and bolster many parents.
Local Organizations
Additional Resources