Employ a Teen

  • The defining quality of the best young leaders is their ability to work.  Those who know how to work are happier, more confident, and better able to adapt to new situations.  They are problem solvers, and most often these young people go on to have successful lives.  From early on, work spelled the difference.

  • Teenagers want employment for more reasons than gas money and the cost of dating.  Some teens need jobs to help families that are struggling financially, and others are saving for college educations. 

  • Many of the teens looking for jobs are foster children.  At least a third of teens actively looking for jobs have not found them, putting their future economic prospects further behind. 

  • Teenagers now compete with adults who need work to provide for their families. 

  • Teenagers are not working in the traditional entry-level or low-skills jobs that have for so long helped them transition into responsibility and adulthood. 

  • Teenagers cannot get experience, unless someone hires them. 

  • Washington Stateís minimum wage is $9.47 an hour as of September 30, 2015.  Workers who are 14 or 15 years old may be paid 85% of the adult minimum wage, which is $8.05.   The minimum wage for 16 and 17-yr old workers is the same as for adults, $9.47 in 2016.  Washington's minimum wage usually changes annually to keep pace with the rising cost of living. (Washington State Dept. of Labor & Industries, http://www.lni.wa.gov/WorkplaceRights/TeenWorkers/Wages/default.asp)

Statistics

What You Can Do
  • Hire a teen to not only help your business, but to invest in that child's coming adulthood.  Help them learn discipline, the value of earning some of their own way, new skills, money management and other personal development attributes.
  • Share job openings with the resources listed under this topic, that can be filled by a person age 16 - 24 years of age.   

  • Advise to teens (and anyone else).  Consider volunteering in an area of interest, to gain experience which you can then add to your resume.  Work hard to become recognized as a dependable worker, one who takes direction, and a hard worker who gets along with other people.  Most of the people who lose their jobs lose them not because they donít know how to do the work, but because they cannot get along with other people.  Volunteering has opened the door to employment for many people.

  • Share job openings with the resources listed on this page - jobs that can be filled by a person age 16-24 years old. 

  • If you are a business willing to hire a young adult foster high school or college student needing a job, call Alene Alexander (509) 714-2799 of Embrace Washington. 

  • Consider the success of STRIVE, a nonprofit program focused on providing job training skills.  STRIVE is a tough love, no excuses approach to job readiness; and they are having tremendous success around the country.  http://striveinternational.org
Local Organizations
Additional Resources

Entry Level Jobs

(Jobs in all States)
Entry level jobs generally require little-to-no previous experience to gain employment.
http://www.entryleveljobs.net/

Next Generation Zone
901 E Second #100
Spokane, WA  99202
(509) 340-7800
jennim@nextgenzone.org 
Hours:  Monday - Friday, 8 am - 4:30 pm
http://www.nextgenzone.org/
A career center for teens and young adults, combining education, GED, career skills training, community and employment resources in one place. 

Spokane Area Work Force Development Council
http://www.wdcspokane.com/services - click Job Openings.