Learning Disabilities
What You Can Do
  • Teach children with learning disabilities about their family’s history.  Children with learning disabilities who know a lot abut their families tend to do better when they face challenges.  (“The Stories That Bind Us,” by Sara Duke, psychologist who works with children with learning disabilities, The New York Times, March 2013)

    "Research shows that children who know where they came from are more resilient.  They are able to handle problems, do better in school and better socially, because they know they are part of something larger than themselves," said Helen Jackson Graham, English professor.  Helen is the Houston area Freedmen's Bureau coordinator, and has 20 years of experience in African American genealogical research.  Nurture the interest and collaboration of genealogical and family history research.  Linking to other families sometimes brings you right back around to your own family.  Help them recover their historical memory.  Help them recognize they are part of one human family.  Help them discover who they are, where they came from, discover their family stories, and to feel connected and bound to their families through generations.  (Source:  Reuniting the Black Family:  Volunteers Index Freedmen's Bureau Records, by Linda Talbot, LDS Church News, November 4, 2015)    


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